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Posts Tagged ‘social impact’

Michigan Behind the Ball with Benefit Corporation Laws.

Good afternoon, all. It has been a while since my last post – I hope you all have been enjoying the summer.

I usually include in these posts a recent photo of downtown Grand Rapids where my office overlooks Rosa Parks Circle.

7.10 On one of my walks downtown last week I decided to take a different photo – the memorial of Rosa Parks – the courageous woman who  this part of downtown Grand Rapids is named after.

It is wonderful to see Rosa Parks, and all that she stood for, honored – prominently at the intersection of Monroe Center and Monroe Avenue.

People, particularly vulnerable people, who stand up for what is right, even in the face of fierce opposition, should be honored.

 

 

 

West Michigan is truly a unique place where business and philanthropy intersect unlike any other place.  Giving of time, talents and treasure to worthy causes is embedded in the culture of this community.

 

Because business as a force for good is part of the fabric of Grand Rapids, it only makes sense to me that social enterprises such as benefit corporations should be able to thrive in West Michigan.

BCorp Certification is Trending in Michigan…

Over the last several years more and more local businesses have becoming Certified B Corps through BLabs. West Michigan has the most concentration of BCorp businesses in the State.

Check out a March article from Rapid Growth Media on the strong presence of Bcorps in West Michigan.

Headlines in Grand Rapids have brought attention to the need for businesses to ask the question: Am I working to build a better community?

 

B-Corp certification is one way (certainly not the only way) for businesses to hold themselves accountable to being a good community partner.

 

Unfortunately, Michigan has no legal framework for BCorps – yet.

 

BCorps?

A few months back the State House tantalized social entrepreneurs, once again, with the possibility of benefit corporations (“Bcorps”) becoming a viable legal option to do business in the State of Michigan.

House Bills 5867, 5868 & 5869 were introduced on April 24, 2018, that would allow BCorps to be formed under Michigan Law.

 

There has been no movement on this bill.

 

Back almost two years ago the legislature proposed similar legislation which died in committee. For a review of the Former BCorp Bills, the House Fiscal Agency issued a Fiscal Analysis, check it out here. 

 

The Analysis provides good background on what the legislation would do. This is helpful for those who are not overly familiar with BCorps in general.

 

 

The latest proposed Bcorp Legislation

The current Bcorp legislation has some different language than the 2016 proposed language. I am assuming it conforms with the model BCorp Legislation. One difference is the definition of “general public benefit” to “specific public benefit” which would be defined under the new Bcorp law as:

 

“SPECIFIC PUBLIC BENEFIT” INCLUDES, BUT IS NOT LIMITED TO,
ANY OF THE FOLLOWING:
(i) PROVIDING LOW-INCOME OR UNDERSERVED INDIVIDUALS OR
COMMUNITIES WITH BENEFICIAL PRODUCTS OR SERVICES.
(ii) PROMOTING ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY FOR INDIVIDUALS OR
COMMUNITIES BEYOND THE CREATION OF JOBS IN THE NORMAL COURSE OF
BUSINESS.

(iii) PRESERVING THE ENVIRONMENT.
(iv) IMPROVING HUMAN HEALTH.
(v) PROMOTING THE ARTS, SCIENCES, OR ADVANCEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE.
(vi) INCREASING THE FLOW OF CAPITAL TO ENTITIES THAT HAVE A
PUBLIC BENEFIT PURPOSE

 

Education on the “why” for BCorps.

Interested groups and local politicians have been educating the public on why BCorp laws would be a good thing for our state.

State Rep Hank Vaupe gave a discussion to a local chamber group on B-Corps two Septembers ago:

As Rep. Vaupe indicated “benefit corporations provide an opportunity for businesses to use the markets, rather than traditional charity giving, to advance their philanthropic missions.”

 

 

Michigan is behind the ball.

 

Over the last several years Michigan legislators have repeatedly introduced BCorp legislation – to no avail.

Check out this handout from Rep Barnett almost 8 years ago in support of the BCorp legislation he proposed in September 2010.

I found particularly interesting the very last section – it provides some comment on why some Michigan businesses may have been averse to the introduction of BCorp legislation. Feel free to read it and reach your own conclusions.

 

Michigan now ranks as one of the vast minority of states that has not enacted benefit corporation legislation.

 

Check out the Benefit Corporation website for a state by state legislative analysis.

 

Of particular note, just a few months back in February our neighboring State of Wisconsin has enacted Bcorp legislation.

 

I am hopeful for a more meaningful update on these Bills in the months to come…

 

Questions? Comments?

Jeshua@dwlawpc.com

http://www.dwlawpc.com

Connect with me on Twitter: @JeshuaTLauka

 

 

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Detroit Startup Week Kicks Off – Schedule Now Available, Includes Legal Workshops

Today starts art festival in Grand Rapids – I took this photo just minutes ago.

Summer is coming fast and so is Detroit Startup Week. Scheduled from June 18-22.

6.1

According to its website, Startup week is:

“A week long celebration of Detroit’s entrepreneurs. Volunteer-led and completely free for attendees, we are aiming to create a community driven event that builds a stronger startup ecosystem. Startup Week is held in dozens 

of cities around the world.”

Crain’s Detroit reported  that the venue will be moved to outdoors where a crowd of 8,000 – 10,000 is expected, up from last year’s 6,500.

Crain’s reports that Startup week will consist of similar “weeklong collection of panel discussions, speeches, activities, networking and competitions is bringing back its women-tailored entrepreneur events.”

 

The Schedule is Now Available

Check out the great workshops and events for entrepreneurs which will take place in Detroit in the coming weeks.

Last year the week kicked off with Detroit’s Small Business Legal Academy.

 

This year there are several types of legal workshops including:

  • Social Enterprise/non-profit.

Social Enterprise is definitely a trending area in Michigan.

 

I think it is no secret – that startup businesses would do well to get some basic legal  during their business startup

 

I had a client send me this e-mail, below (unprompted) which I was given permission to share – it is extremely on point:

 

“I don’t think you understand how valuable your assistance is. A small guy like me, without you, would sign whatever they put in front of me and get into big trouble because of that someday.  The problem is that most small businesses don’t understand how critical legal review is either.” – client

 

The reality is that there are a host of legal areas that can turn into pitfalls for startup businesses – over the years I have written on quite a few of those areas, including:

Terms and Conditions in Contracts

Non-Competition Agreements

Entity Formation and Personal Liability

Personal Guarantees

 

 

Cash flow is a barrier for startups. This doesn’t mean you should avoid educating yourself on the legal issues affecting your business.

Take advantage of the resources available.

Consult with an attorney – Particularly law firms friendly to startup businesses.

 

e-mail: Jeshua@dwlawpc.com

www.dwlawpc.com

twitter: @JeshuaTLauka

My Thoughts on Social Enterprise: Am I Living Each Day with Conviction and Purpose?

Last week I mowed the lawn for the first time this year.

I didn’t have any gas to fill up the mower, so I just relied on the unknown amount of gas that had been in the mower over the winter.

As I was mowing the back yard, the largest portion of my lawn, I kept wondering – is this gas going to last the entire lawn? I really had no idea.

5.24

I like mowing the lawn because it gets me thinking outside of myself.

My thoughts shifted to a friend who had unexpectedly passed away in February. My friend was the same age as me, 37, he was in excellent health, married with young children. He died suddenly of a heart attack while vacationing with his family.

 

 

 

 

I am sure my friend had no idea that morning he woke up on vacation, that it would be his last on earth.

 

Mowing the lawn without knowing how much gas was in the tank reminded me of how none of us are promised tomorrow.

I had no idea when my mower was out of gas.

None of us knows when we will breathe our last breath.

It gave me pause to ask myself:

am I living each day with conviction and purpose?

am I living each day for what really matters?

 

I think we all could benefit from this “eternal” or “purposeful” mindset.

 

This “purposeful mindset”  is one reason why I love social entrepreneurs:

Those in business who are purposeful in using their business as a force for good.

 

And it is why I am excited about the proposed Benefit Corporation laws that have once again been introduced in the State Legislature.

 

My call to you:
Be purposeful.

Be eternally minded.

 

Questions? Comments?

Jeshua@dwlawpc.com

http://www.dwlawpc.com

Connect with me on Twitter: @JeshuaTLauka

 

Michigan is Back Trending Towards Social Entrepreneurship: April 24, 2018 Benefit Corporation Legislation Proposed.

April 30, 2018 3 comments

Good morning! Downtown Grand Rapids is starting to look and feel like spring. The trees are just starting to get their leaves – I can’t wait for West Michigan to become green once again.

4.30

Speaking of new life – the legislature has breathed new life in the possibility of benefit corporations (“Bcorps”) becoming a viable legal option to do business in the State of Michigan.

House Bills 5867, 5868 & 5869 were introduced last week, on April 24, 2018, that would allow BCorps to be formed under Michigan Law.

 

Back almost two years ago the legislature proposed similar legislation which died in committee. For a review of the Former BCorp Bills, the House Fiscal Agency issued a Fiscal Analysis, check it out here. The Analysis provides good background on what the legislation would do. This is helpful for those who are not overly familiar with BCorps in general.

 

 

The latest proposed Bcorp Legislation

The current Bcorp legislation has some different language than the 2016 proposed language. One difference is the definition of “general public benefit” to “specific public benefit” which would be defined under the new Bcorp law as:

 

“SPECIFIC PUBLIC BENEFIT” INCLUDES, BUT IS NOT LIMITED TO,
ANY OF THE FOLLOWING:
(i) PROVIDING LOW-INCOME OR UNDERSERVED INDIVIDUALS OR
COMMUNITIES WITH BENEFICIAL PRODUCTS OR SERVICES.
(ii) PROMOTING ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY FOR INDIVIDUALS OR
COMMUNITIES BEYOND THE CREATION OF JOBS IN THE NORMAL COURSE OF
BUSINESS.

(iii) PRESERVING THE ENVIRONMENT.
(iv) IMPROVING HUMAN HEALTH.
(v) PROMOTING THE ARTS, SCIENCES, OR ADVANCEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE.
(vi) INCREASING THE FLOW OF CAPITAL TO ENTITIES THAT HAVE A
PUBLIC BENEFIT PURPOSE

 

I still need to perform a more detailed review of the legislation to see how it differs from the prior iteration; and also how it compares to what other states are doing.

 

 

Education on the “why” for BCorps.

Interested groups and local politicians have been educating the public on why BCorp laws would be a good thing for our state.

State Rep Hank Vaupe gave a discussion to a local chamber group on B-Corps two Septembers ago:

As Rep. Vaupe indicated “benefit corporations provide an opportunity for businesses to use the markets, rather than traditional charity giving, to advance their philanthropic missions.”

 

BCorp Certification is Trending in Michigan…

Over the last several years more and more local businesses have becoming Certified B Corps through BLabs. West Michigan has the most concentration of BCorp businesses in the State.

Check out a March article from Rapid Growth Media on the strong presence of Bcorps in West Michigan.

Headlines in Grand Rapids have brought attention to the need for businesses to ask the question: Am I working to build a better community?

 

B-Corp certification is one way (certainly not the only way) for businesses to hold themselves accountable to being a good community partner.

 

Why has it taken so long to get here?

 

Over the last several years Michigan legislators have introduced BCorp legislation – to no avail.

Check out this handout from Rep Barnett several years ago in support of the BCorp legislation he proposed in September 2010.

I found particularly interesting the very last section – it provides some comment on why some Michigan businesses may have been averse to the introduction of BCorp legislation. Feel free to read it and reach your own conclusions.

Trending Towards Social Entrepreneurship.

The trends all show that millennials and our up and coming workforce want to to be part of business as a force for good in our local community.

Questions? Comments?

Jeshua@dwlawpc.com

http://www.dwlawpc.com

Connect with me on Twitter: @JeshuaTLauka

Fintech Startup “Lemonade” Latest $120 Million Round of Funding – Following Through on Its Purpose Driven Mission.

December 21, 2017 Leave a comment

“The key to disrupting a billion-dollar industry is ‘ignorance”  check out this recent article on “Lemonade” via BusinessInsider

 

In the past I have posted on Fintech Companies – and highlighted a few. One of those in particular is “Lemonade” a disrupter in the urban rental and home insurance industry.  Check out an update on some exciting things Lemonade is doing.

Yesterday TechCrunch reported that The Softbank Group is leading a $120 million round of funding for Lemonade.

2015-11-26-13-04-02

 

But as a threshold matter:

What is Fintech?

 

According to FinTech Weekly:

Financial technology, also known as FinTech, is a line of business based on using software to provide financial services. Financial technology companies are generally startups founded with the purpose of disrupting incumbent financial systems and corporations that rely less on software.

 

The idea of a business’ purpose of “disrupting incumbent”…anything is intriguing to me.

Some systems need to be disrupted. I have previously posted my own thoughts on being a disruptive force for good.

To that point, Lemonade seemingly fits the bill. Look no further than it’s mission statement on its homepage: “Instant everything. Killer prices. Big heart.

About Lemonade:

According to its website, Lemonade is the “World’s First P2P Insurance Company” (Peer-to-Peer).

Lemonade provides Renters and Homeowners Insurance to New Yorkers.

According to a CrowdFundInsider article: “Lemonade has positioned its platform in a David vs. Goliath battle to challenge antediluvian insurance incumbents by providing a far better service at a superior price.”

Who doesn’t root for the underdog?

Technology Driven.

Shai Wininger, co-founder and President of Lemonade, explained to CrowdfundInsider that technology drives everything at Lemonade.

“From signing up to submitting a claim, the entire experience is mobile, sim

ple and remarkably fast. What used to take weeks or months now happens in minutes or seconds. It’s what you get when you replace brokers and paperwork with bots and machine learning.”

Disruptive Force for Good.

Daniel Schreiber, co-founder and CEO of Lemonade. told CrowdfundInsider “the opportunity is unusual. Disrupting an industry that has not changed for a hundred years ”

According to an article posted by Venture Beat:

Lemonade is also setting out to combat existing models through an annual “giveback,” where it donates unclaimed money to good causes.”

Talk is cheap.  Has Lemonade followed through on its actions?

Apparently so – in a very impressive way.

Softbank, in leading the latest round of funding for Lemonade had this to say about Lemonade’s innovative business model

“The idea is that users won’t file unnecessary claims if they know that the money isn’t just going to be kept by a faceless corporate entity and will, instead, support a cause they care about.”

 

Lemonade’s 2017 GiveBack

Lemonade posted last year that its Giveback for 2017 was $53,174:

this amounts to 10.2% of its 2017 revenue.

It hasn’t reported the Giveback for 2018 yet.

 

The article highlighted one such GiveBack recipient: New Story

“New Story builds safe homes for the homeless, and aims to transform slums into thriving communities in the developing world.”

 

“Through the Giveback to New Story, the Lemonade community built a new home for the Quitéño family, from start to finish. Now, the Quitéño family will have a safe home to return to every day, giving them a stable foundation to improve their health, education, and income.”

 

Conclusion.

Lemonade is doing some innovative work for the social good.

I love the concept of this startup –

a. taking a risk doing something different;

b. disrupting business as usual;

c. for the good of others.

That’s social entrepreneurship at its finest.

If you are a homeowner or tenant residing in New York, this company is worth checking out.

e-mail: Jeshua@dwlawpc.com

http://www.dwlawpc.com

Twitter: @JeshuaTLauka

Today I was confronted with the Need For Affordable Housing in Grand Rapids.

November 2, 2017 5 comments

Today I did what I routinely do on Thursdays around noon time – I visited the school where I mentor a student.

MTM

I walked to the classroom and talked

with his teacher who told me that this student was no longer enrolled in the school.

Just like that, a relationship that I had developed over the school year was suddenly without warning severed.

Imagine what an incident like this does for a kid with an unstable home environment.

In a matter of days an elementary school kid’s life (which, in this case, is typically already chaotic enough) can be flipped upside down.

New school. New housing.

Lack of community.

This program that I have been involved in over the past several years connects adults as mentors to school-aged kids is great.

It provides an opportunity for a supportive adult to encourage and love kids, tell them they are valued, made in the image of God.

This program provides a sense of community, a network of relationships for these kids.

I see how eviction can instantaneously severe these important relationships, causing displacement and uproot community.

 

My Perspective – Wearing several hats

I’ve written before about the fact that I wear a few different hats

I am a lawyer who represents real estate owners, investors, property managers/landlords.

I am occasionally in court evicting tenants who simply have not paid their rent. This lack of payment causes real problems for landlords, many of whom are simply trying to pay down their mortgage obligations.

I am the past-Board Chair at Mel Trotter Ministries.

MTM is the safety net for the homeless in the community. It is the place where families without a home seek temporary refuge and hope to get back into affordable and stable housing.  MTM is doing its part to find a solution to the affordable housing crisis in Kent County.

I am also a mentor in a local school to students, many who regularly face homelessness.

In the past several years all of the kids that I have mentored have relocated. The reasons and issues behind their relocation are varied and complex.

I know that lack of affordable housing was a factor at least in some of those situations.

 

I see firsthand the tension:

 We should encourage entrepreneurs to revitalize our community  – we should do everything we can to place families in affordable housing.

There is a tension: and it needs to be embraced.

I get these words of wisdom – to “embrace the tension” we see in our daily lives from a man I admire named Fred Keller – founder of Cascade Engineering. Check out his blog where he speaks directly about the tension between “purpose and profit”

For me, the answer isn’t ignoring the tension on complicated matters – which is why I am writing this post. I embrace it.

I will continue to show up and mentor students.

I will continue to serve at Mel Trotter Ministries.

I will continue to provide legal services to the best of my ability for my business clients.

 

e-mail: Jeshua@dwlawpc.com

Twitter: @JeshuaTLauka

www.dwlawpc.com

Community Revitalization To Include Downtown Grocery Stores: Update on The Urban Food Initiative.

August 1, 2017 Leave a comment

Yesterday I read a story about a Detroiter, Raphael Wright who plans on opening a “mission-driven supermarket” in downtown Detroit. Check out the article on NextCity.

Raphael’s idea is sparked by a much needed grocery option in Detroit- particularly for low-income residents.

I love this idea.

A few years back I took my family to New York City. We loved the walk-ability of City life – that you could walk down a block to a grocery store and get all of your household needs.

food-healthy-vegetables-potatoesI love downtown Grand Rapids.

 

If Grand Rapids wants to encourage urban living, it needs a downtown grocery store.

In February, House Bill 4207 was introduced in the Michigan house. Known as the “Urban Food Initiative” it would provide incentives for community revitalization that would include a downtown Grocery Store.

 

 

Specifically, HB 4207 would make “Urban Food Initiatives” allowable to receive funds under the Michigan Community Revitalization Program

 

An update since my last post, in May, the Trade and Commerce Committee recommended a substitute bill, check here.

The Bill substitute changed the name,  Urban Food Initiatives, to “NEIGHBORHOOD AND COMMERCIAL CORRIDOR FOOD INITIATIVE”  – thereby broadening the applicability of these community revitalization incentives –  I have bracketed the additional language:

Property that will be used primarily as a retail supermarket, grocery store, produce market or delicatessen that is located in a downtown [OR IN A DEVELOPMENT AREA AS DEFINED IN SECTION 2 OF 3 THE CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT AUTHORITY ACT] area…that offers unprocessed USDA inspected meat and poultry products or meat products that carry the USDA organic seal, fresh fruit and vegetables, and dairy products for sale to the public.”

The other substantive revision to the substitute bill would require that at least 5% of community revitalization incentives be awarded to these initiatives. Check out the Bill Analysis from the House Fiscal Agency, for more information.

 

Clearly having available and healthy food options in a downtown are necessary to City living, particularly for low-income residents. Check out a previous article from Next City about the Food Revolution in Detroit.

A downtown grocery store is necessary if a City wants to attract urban living – it is also necessary to provide healthy food options for those living downtown without readily available transportation.

 

 

I think particularly of the under-employed and the homeless who receive services from organizations like Mel Trotter Ministries. Grand Rapids has a need for affordable housing for the most vulnerable in our society. It would be great to see grocery options as well.

I am looking forward to tracking the progress of this bill. I am also encouraged by the many businesses in West Michigan taking serious their responsibility as community stakeholders and asking the question: “How am I building a better community?

e-mail: Jeshua@dwlawpc.com

http://www.dwlawpc.com

Twitter: @JeshuaTLauka